How To Use Augmented Reality In Education

Posted by Ryan Schaaf on

“Augmented reality is an exciting trend that brings immersive technology to a whole other level. Using technology’s ability to capture and transmit vast amounts of data, some hardware, apps, and games can bring another layer of understanding to the world around us. This article written by Jeff Dunn at Edudemic summarizes several educational applications of augmented reality. Another excellent example is from Professor Jason Ohler’s ‘ARt’ augmented reality gallery featured on this YouTube video.”

 

via Edudemic

augmented reality

When you were a kid, did you watch RoboCop and totally love the heads-up display? What about the fascinating visuals in Minority Report or Iron Man? They’re basically a form of augmented reality (AR for short). Augmented reality is not something limited to just Hollywood blockbusters though. There are a bunch of ways people are using augmented reality in education, believe it or not.

Before you get your feathers all ruffled, though, let’s clear something up. Augmented reality is not exactly stuff like Google Glass or Iron Man. Instead, it’s an array of apps, web tools, and games designed to enhance learning through interactive experiences. That’s my definition at least.

In an effort to shed some light on the current tools and teachers using AR, I thought it might be useful to assemble a list of what we’re seeing these days. Since Edudemic is based in Cambridge, MA we see a lot of innovative startups and other AR-related organizations coming out of MIT and Harvard on a regular basis. It’s pretty crazy.

In any case, here are just a handful of interesting AR use cases that you should check out. Know of another one? Feel free to mention it down in the comments!

Project Glass

google glass official

The most famous AR project is being, of course, led by the folks at Google. We’ve been seeing a lot of new ways to integrate Google Glass into the classroom over the past few months. We’ve even showcased a few of them. One of the biggest ways that we’re seeing, however, is the idea that students can use Glass whilst on field trips and outside the classroom. They can do digital scavenger hunts, find classmates, or simply learn more about their surroundings using their handy pair of AR glasses.

MITAR Games

mit dome

The MIT Teacher Education Program, in conjunction with The Education Arcade, has been working on creating “Augmented Reality” simulations to engage people in simulation games that combine real world experiences with additional information supplied to them by handheld computers. The first of these games, Environmental Detectives (ED), is an outdoor game in which players using GPS guided handheld computers try to uncover the source of a toxic spill by interviewing virtual characters and conducting large scale simulated environmental measurements and analyzing data. This game has been run at three sites, including MIT, a nearby nature center, and a local high school. Early research has shown that this mode of learning is successful in engaging university and secondary school students in large scale environmental engineering studies, and providing an authentic mode of scientific investigation.

Star Walk

star walk

This was one of the earlier iPhone apps that really caught the attention of the world. Along with hits like Angry Birds and Starbucks, Star Walk was one of those must-try apps. It’s only gotten better since then. Basically, you can hold your phone up to the sky at night and see more than 200,000 celestial bodies. You can then view detailed information about those stars, constellations, and more. Definitely worth a try!

Second Life

secondlife

Second Life is actually a pretty old school AR game nowadays. They do, however, have a fabulous education area that will answer all the questions you, as a teacher, will have. Essentially, you get an avatar that you use to walk / fly around the Second Life world. It was far more popular a few years ago but there is still quite a large group of folks using the tool. I have taken a graduate-level course that relied on Second Life for group meetups, believe it or not. It wasn’t the most elegant solution but it was quite fun. I didn’t actually hate having group meetups!

AR Development Lab

ardl

The ARDL is a revolutionary concept that makes virtual, 3D objects appear in the real world, attached to real objects. Users look through a Virtual Reality POV Viewing Device or at a monitor to see virtual objects like planets, volcanoes, the human heart or dinosaurs. These can be attached to cards, the pages of a book, interactive white board or even on the floor or wall to provide a 3D animated replica that fills the room. Virtual objects excel at conveying spatial, temporal and contextual concepts-especially when the real objects (or real replicas) are too expensive, dangerous, or fragile. They can also be highly interactive, letting users erupt a volcano, build a human heart or pull planets out of the solar system for closer inspection.